SysOp

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SysOp wrote (edited )

FYI: episode 9 "Child's Play" @ 05:30 into the episode... the book page she is reading on the train:

Page 51 of Eyewitness Companions: Mythology by Neil Philip, Philip Wilkinson. Google Books

Quote I matched: "god of the sea and, along with Zeus and the Underworld god Hades, was one of the three greatest deities of Ancient Greece. He had huge power, and his ability to summon up earthquakes and storms at sea made mortals tremble at his strength. If thwarted or defeated, he would unleash a terrible flood—which is precisely what happened when he got involved in a dispute over which deity should have power over Athens."

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SysOp wrote (edited )

@2:38 - the narrative that audiences liked it, critics did not, I think is generally true if you look at a key point you emphasized. Expensive action scene after high-budget action scene. The violence is titillating. There are people who like the film just because of the energy, violence, action. Same probably goes for the customs, artwork, etc.

The story - and it's themes as they relate to other stories and the world at large - that's something I don't find consumptive audiences put much concern into other than expanding on the elements they liked (fight scenes, technology levels of fighting in one group vs. another, etc).

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SysOp wrote

@28:40 I would also emphasize that metaphor does not require authorial intent. In the storytelling of Muhammad, the Quran, the author of the story truly believes much of what he is telling. And audiences can project upon such metaphorical story elements from their own mind, even when they contradict other parts of the story or other well-known (competing/conflicting) stories. The crisis of a society comes when people forget that metaphors are dynamic, shape shifting, and instead declare them factual and declare certain interpretations of them as believers and other interpretations as non-believers. In contrast, when progression of understanding and expansion of tolerance are the central concern (the highest concern) - one would declare such story elements as dynamic, flexible, fascinatingly complex. Inclusive of multiple interpretations, and even future ideas and thoughts, instead of a closed and rigid system of segregating interpretations into group factions.

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SysOp wrote

Paradox story element, a key to mythology stories, paradoxes of interpretation. Human psychology, mind seams.

Does Yoda mean that he knows Rey took the books, has the library, or does he mean that her past experience of self-raising, like Buddha story, prepares her to be the author of new books? The paradox is this: how did the books get written, what comes first - experience or books? Who teaches the book author?

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SysOp wrote

Yoda's point was that her life's pain, on her home world, parent loss - was her training. The brief encounter with Luke on the island was like a doctorate thesis committee. Her training was her entire lifetime of suffering.

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SysOp wrote

"For all you people out there that theorized over the last 2 years on reddit, youtube or fan forum who snoke was, or his background

For all you people who wondered how the great jedi master Luke, who fearlessly confronted Vader and The Emperor and help take down the empire in the OT, wondering how he was going to help fight against the first order (remeber, they made a big deal about finding him in TFA...it was all about the map). But only to find out he was hermit and coward, got taken down by a girl in a mini duel, a girl who only held a light saber twice, and then only for him to die a senseless death

For all you people who spent the last 2 years theorized on who Rey's parents were, only to find out she was abonded by drunks.

For all you people who remember watching The Empire Strikes Back in a movies theater when you were an 8 years old kid, all you out there that grew up with Star Wars as part of their childhood.

How about Knights of Ren? Well you get the point, and i can go on and on

To all you people I just want you guys to know that Disney and Rian Johnson took their middle fingers, shoved them straight up your ass and took your $20. Im done with this franchise!" - https://www.reddit.com/r/RedLetterMedia/comments/7jke23/spoilers_star_wars_the_last_jedi_discussion_thread/dre9610

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SysOp wrote

"I really hope Disney will now get the same treatment we gave to EA, because of their hidden goals in these movies. It would be good for our culture and civilization: short, medium and long term.

With TFA they fooled some people with many hopes and hypes. But I saw TLJ failure coming from very afar, because when you grow up it becomes so obvious big Hollywood studios with only money in their minds must do this kind of things to franchises. You see, George Lucas did like money, but he proved now and again that for him there was and is more to his working in art than merely money. He is a man with certain values and goals in life, most of them pretty healthy and deep, which in one way or another he fused into his works.

And so these two movies now really proved even to the most sap of viewers that SW was indeed George Lucas. It was bound to his sensitivity in life and history, his subjective understanding of the world (paired with that of good collaborators, for sure), and of course also the numerous mistakes sometimes coming out of his naive film making skills. Yes, not everything this man did was perfect, but that is true for 99% of the myths and stories written by any ambitious story teller in history. You may always nit pick and build a fair critic of somebody's body of works, from Homer to Tolstoy, from Tolkien to Miyazaki, from Dante to Asimov, passing through Gaiman or any other person. Some of these authors were better, some were worse in their specific art. What stays is that Lucas' lore was decently eternal and allowed youths of all walks of life and in any world culture to dream and impersonate themselves into these stories, these heroes, that looked so far from their earthy lives, while delivering higher moral and spiritual values to them in a very cool format.

Lucas wanted a story that had to be a myth for the modern (initially Anglo-Saxon) world, and he delivered it, with all aspects of typical humane anthropological archetypes and many forms of human spirituality funded into his opera. Not all perfect, not always completely successfully, but forever inspirationally.

Disney only entered into this "Galaxy" for money and the social engineering they are deemed to apply on society by their prominent cultural role in it. Their collaborator Kathleen Kennedy, for however capable of a business professional she may be, is clearly in this only for personal ego building and to deal with personal unresolved complexes. They both end up perpetrating their moral weaknesses onto the viewership. A strong difference compared to Lucas, who was perhaps worse at film making, maybe a weaker man sometimes, but wanted to deliver a message and uplift the common viewer to something higher through a very popular mean/media.

What happened to Star Wars is very sad, but it is the world we are living in nowadays. Indeed, what happened to Star Wars is actually a perfect metaphor of the civilizational struggle and battle our generation in history is living through. On one side a purely individualist ego- and money-driven civilizational trope, ready to use any mean, or any twist of human psychology to rule and manipulate, on the other side traditional worlds nearer to spirituality that albeit very imperfect still live for and through higher values and visions embedded into a more eternal understanding of life on earth, as well as a collective sense of life and humanity manifested through responsibility in one's actions and therefore one's art. And doesn't this resemble a little bit what Lucas tried to defend us from with his Dark Side-Light Side message for the modern person?

I'm never going to spend again not only money, but also no more seconds of my life on any new SW product, like I don't do on any other product of this war onto myself and the psychological well-being of me and people dear to me.

I'm pretty sure SW will go from being a relatively legendary product, into eventually being one more useless series that will fade away in a few years. Some things you can't buy with money. Disney knows it, the management is made up of cunning people, they are in SW for the next few years or exactly the time needed to strip the brand clean from any deepness and meaning, then let the world forget about it and pass to the next one. But the old Lucas trilogies will stay with future civilizations as decent examples of human story telling that were fit for the historic age they were released in, contrary to anything Disney will ever release.

We can help Disney and the industry stop this treatment of ourselves only by stripping them of our money AND attention. Attention in particular. I will do for sure, I hope many many more will realize this is an important interest of us all. And who knows, despite I don't really believe in it, maybe there is still some small hope for SW (we saw with the EU that there are other artists that simply get what SW was meant to be and can creatively enrich it). But not for now." - https://www.reddit.com/r/StarWars/comments/7kbrob/the_last_jedi_opening_weekend_day_3_megathread/drds2zl